Reviews

'I have a very lively 7-month-old Hungarian Vizsla bitch called Wilma. I consider Wilma to be very clever and quick to pick things up but she is also a typical Vizsla in that she is wilful and choosy and only likes to do things that she finds enjoyable, rewarding and fun!
As we took the Slider out of the bag she was interested to know what it was! As the treats came out the intrigue heightened! I placed the treats just in the gaps without any of the ‘sliders’ over them. When introducing a young dog I would recommend making it as easy as possible for instant success for the first few goes. After three or four successful attempts, I placed a treat under a slider. Wilma successfully retrieved the treat by snuffling the treat and moving the slider thus revealing the treat! I repeated this several times in the same place before moving the treat around the board.
As Wilma became a Puzzle-It pro! I added the blocks thus introducing a thought-provoking problem. With the blocks in the sliders have no where to slide! It did not take Wilma long to work out that she needed to remove the blocks and then slide the slider!Verbal encouragement was required here to help her! She did get a little distracted thinking she may like to chew the blocks prior to sniffing out the treats! Wilma is not a very gentle girlie; in fact she is a bit of a thug!
Mind activities, such as these puzzles, can help with many issues relating to your four-legged friends. When dogs lives are enriched with a good diet; the right amount of exercise; a secure, loving home; consistent guide lines and boundaries, and healthy entertainment such as well-designed toys and thought-provoking games such as Puzzle-It, they are happier, less stressed and will be more responsive.
Dogs who are unable to have sufficient exercise for various reasons can be mentally stimulated by playing with these games. It is ideal for dogs on cage rest (following medical advice) while it can also help dogs with certain behavioural problems deal with frustration. But above all, it is a fun activity and something that gives you the opportunity to interact with your dog. Do bear in mind it is not a dog sitter! Your dog should never be left alone with these type of games as they are likely to chew them and may digest pieces which could be dangerous.
You can use a variety of treats in these games from tasty cheese and sausage to plain old kibble. Wilma also had to show impulse control; by sitting and waiting for me to reload which is another bonus to the puzzles! I also taught her the command ‘find it’.
This puzzle is good fun for the dog! I would recommended it'
-Shelley Heading from the Association of Pet Dog Trainers UK and the Dog House Training Academy

'I thought id let you know she loves the puzzle. She got the hang of the sliding technique within minutes and now rinses the board of treats within a minute or so. she is still trying to get the hang of the blocks though- so far only managing once by whapping it out the way with a well aimed paw. She needs to figure out its done by using her mouth. at the moment I'm putting just one block in and she quickly empties the puzzle straight away from treats, then spends a long time trying to figure out the one with the block, going away and coming back every so often. Its very entertaining for her and us, it is great to watch a dog think., such frequently unused ability in a pet dog. She scratches it like crazy but as of yet no scratch marks so well done on your product quality plus im very happy for her to be playing with wood not plastic- a true Fredrick Froebel dog toy.'
-Emily, pug owner

'Good to see you at Paws in the Park, our 16 week old Siberian Husky loved his slider. He figured it out pretty quick! -Tanya, Siberian Husky owner

If you own one of our puzzles and have any comments you would like to appear here, send them to us here.

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Treats

Use small pieces of food as a supplement to meals, adjusting the amount of food to the number of treats given.

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Training Tips

Check out our tips for how to get the most out of puzzle-play for you and your dog.

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